Jeremy Davis
Jeremy Davis
Sitecore, C# and web development
Jeremy Davis
Jeremy Davis
Sitecore, C# and web development

Posts tagged Sitecore (Page 2)

Sitecore containers and expired licenses

Sometimes you have a problem that you should absolutely have seen coming. The annual "the company's Sitecore license has expired" fun is very much one of those things. But I'd not thought about this in advance, and the license expired while I was on holiday this year. It caused my team a load of hassle... But I have a plan to avoid this pain in the future:

Using ItemService in containers

I was asked to enable Sitecore's ItemService endpoints on a containerised instance of Sitecore recently, and my first pass through this didn't work. Turns out there's a key bit of documentation that seems to be missing for this scenario. Hence a quick post to help get info into Google. So if you need to do this, read on:

Recovering from a packaging mistake

A while back I got a support issue where a client's Content Editor was suddenly very broken. No UI – just a giant YSOD. It's turned out to be the sort of mistake which I could see happening to others, so here's some info on what happened and ways the problem can be resolved.

Revisiting waiting for Kubernetes deployments

Some time back, when I was looking at how to release containerised Sitecore into Azure Kubernetes Clusters, I worked through the question of "how do I make DevOps wait for the new images to be deployed", because you might want to run further work after the new containers are spun up. While what I tried back then was mostly working, I've found some reasons to try a different tack since then.

So, are you an Infinidash expert yet?

It seems everyone is suddenly an expert in this exciting new tech. And if you weren't paying attention, you may have missed the joke behind all of this – that it's an entirely made-up technology. Funny as the twitter shenangans were, I think there's a point hiding here for us as developers. What is it? Well...

Should we be scared of platform change?

My previous post talked about the interesting technical changes that Sitecore is achieving through acquisitions. While talking about that with assorted developers, one worry I've heard a few times is "how does all that technical change affect my career?". There seems to be a common thread of worry about how this change might devalue people's experience.

So does it?

Thinking about Sitecore's spending spree

If you're paying any attention, you can't have helped noticing that Sitecore have been on a bit of a spending spree recently. They've acquired three new companies, and hence there's a lot of talk in the community about what this might mean for the future of "being a Sitecore developer". This topic came up on the US Sitecore Lunch recently, and that prompted me to think about it a bit more...

Patching Kubernetes config

Deploying Sitecore (or anything else) in containers has been a big learning curve for me. Every so often I come across a new aspect of the whole business that I've not seen before. This week, another agency's work showed me a new thing which might help with making changes to Kubernetes config. The approaches I'd seen to deployments involved pushing all of the Kubernetes config each time you want to release, but it turns out you may not need to do that...

Waiting for Godot Kubernetes

I've been slowly improving the release process for the container-based project I'm working on. There's a lot to learn about the ways to configure the Azure Devops pipelines for this work, because targeting Kubernetes is quite different from the old IaaS and PaaS approaches I was used to.

v10.1's new database update strategy

One of the interesting things that's arrived with Sitecore v10.1 is a new approach to how items get updated when you change versions. This change is aimed at containerised deployments, and I'm in the middle of a containerised project. So I figured I should take a look...